A Health Service Psychologist is a licensed/certified psychologist, at the independent practice level in his/her state, province, territory, or country, who is trained and experienced in the delivery of preventive, consultative, assessment, and treatment.

Vision

To improve the health of a diverse and global community.

Mission

The National Register of Health Service Psychologists:

  • credentials health service psychologists;
  • promotes health service psychologists;
  • provides distinction and value to health service psychologists;
  • guides psychology students and early career psychologists (ECPs) toward credentialing;
  • enhances health service psychologists’ contributions to healthcare; and
  • identifies qualified health service psychologists in the global community.

Mission Driven Activities

To credential health service psychologists, we:

  1. Determine which licensed psychologists meet the National Register’s stringent requirements for education, internship, and experience as healthcare professionals;
  2. Monitor the licensure status and ethical conduct of health service psychologists by verifying licensure status with the primary source at least twice yearly and requiring health service psychologists to attest to ethical conduct annually; and
  3. Develop standards for evaluating the education, training and credentialing of health service psychologists.

To promote health service psychologists, we:

  1. Provide free access to our database of credentialing and contact information on ~10,500 health service psychologists (FindaPsychologist.org); and
  2. Disseminate articles, useful websites, and self-help resources.

To provide distinction and value to health service psychologists, we:

  1. Promote health service psychologists
  2. Advocate for their services and scope of practice at the state and federal levels;
  3. Expedite licensure mobility for health service psychologists in 46 jurisdictions in the US and Canada, and in other countries;
  4. Verify health service psychologists’ credentials to healthcare organizations through NationalRegisterPro.org;
  5. Market health service psychologists through FindaPsychologist.org and Profile Pages;
  6. Offer free continuing education (CE) programs* for health service psychologists;
  7. Publish The Register Report online and in print;
  8. Build stakeholder networks through social media outreach;
  9. Recognize early career psychologists through the Judy E. Hall Award; and
  10. Recognize lifetime achievement in psychology through the A.M. Wellner Distinguished Career Award.

*The National Register is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The National Register maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

To guide psychology students and ECPs toward credentialing, we:

  1. Offer the National Psychologist Trainee Register (NPTR) for banking approved credentials and charting progress toward licensure and credentialing;
  2. Award NPTR and ECP credentialing scholarships;
  3. identify qualified doctoral programs in psychology (ASPPB/National Register Designation Project) and evaluate internship and postdoctoral supervised experience in health service provision; and
  4. publish articles by doctoral students and ECPs in The Register Report.

To enhance health service psychologists’ contributions to healthcare, we:

  1. Monitor healthcare reform and disseminate information on the integral role of health service psychologists;
  2. Identify and promote examples of effective models for quality healthcare services;
  3. Advocate for the integration of psychological services into primary healthcare; and
  4. Serve as a National Committee on Quality Assurance (NCQA) deemed source for credentials verification of psychologists’ education, training and board certification.

To identify qualified health service psychologists in the global community, we:

  1. expedite licensure mobility for health service psychologists throughout the world;
  2. review the education and training of internationally-trained applicants for health service psychologist credentialing;
  3. review the education of internationally-trained applicants for licensure on behalf of state, provincial, and territorial licensing boards;
  4. collaborate in the development of an international register of psychologists.