Evidence-Based Assessment of Intimate Partner Violence in Community Settings

Citation

Bannon, S. M., & Salwen-Deremer, J. K. (2018). Evidence-based assessment of intimate partner violence in community settings. Journal of Health Service Psychology, 44, 3–6.

Abstract

Intimate partner violence victimization (IPV; psychological, physical, or sexual acts against a current or former romantic partner) is a highly prevalent, yet sensitive concern for both patients and mental health professionals. Patients may worry about the potential consequences of disclosing experiences of abuse for myriad reasons. Practitioners may wonder about the best methods for identifying at-risk patients and for initiating a conversation. Using evidence from numerous studies on identification, assessment, and treatment of IPV, we present guidance for assessment in community settings and outline important considerations for mental health professionals.

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Assessing and Treating Sleep Difficulties in Anxious Children and Adolescents

Citation

Swan, A., & Carpenter, J. (2018). Assessing and treating sleep difficulties in anxious children and adolescents. Journal of Health Service Psychology, 44, 7–13.

Abstract

Ten percent of children experience anxiety disorders, and the majority of them also have sleep-related problems. A multi-step process is recommended to help children and adolescents with anxiety achieve independent and sufficient sleep, which includes 1) establishing good sleep hygiene to set the stage for quality sleep, 2) using cognitive behavioral therapy with exposures to help children and adolescents learn to manage anxiety that interferes with sleep, 3) using behavioral sleep interventions to address poor sleep onset associations and other sleep specific concerns, and 4) tailoring interventions throughout treatment to match caregiver and child needs. Parent guidance and training is essential to help change maladaptive sleeping patterns.

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Behavioral Intervention in Tinnitus Management

Citation

Schmidt, C. J., & Henry, J. A. (2018). Behavioral intervention in tinnitus management. Journal of Health Service Psychology, 44, 15–18.

Abstract

Tinnitus is the presence of ringing or buzzing in the ears or head. Between 10% and 15% of Americans have some degree of tinnitus. There is no cure for tinnitus, which is a symptom of other problems, not a disease itself. Progressive tinnitus management, an intervention developed over the last 22 years, is described. CBT for tinnitus is a component of the intervention program.

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Feedback on Invalid Neuropsychological Testing: Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI)

Citation

Ellison, R. L., & Stika, M. (2018). Feedback on invalid neuropsychological testing: Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Journal of Health Service Psychology, 44, 19–23.

Abstract

Performance validity tests (PVTs) and symptom validity tests (SVTs) are important in neuropsychological testing to capture the patient’s engagement with the testing process and any attempts to influence it. However, it can be clinically difficult to provide patients with meaningful feedback on the testing when one or more measures of validity were failed. This is a frequent challenge in cases of mild traumatic brain injury. Several methods of presenting useful information to the patient and family are described.

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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Pain

Citation

Thorn, B. E. (2018). Cognitive behavioral therapy for chronic pain. Journal of Health Service Psychology, 44, 25–32.

Abstract

Over one third of Americans report chronic pain of one type or another. The causes of chronic pain are multi-faceted, and often do not involve identifiable tissue damage. Opioid therapy for chronic pain has a high risk for opioid dependency, addiction, and possible death. CBT is a proven alternative intervention. This article describes a 10-session CBT program for the treatment of chronic pain.

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Conversations About Suicide: Strategies for Detecting and Assessing Suicide Risk

Citation

Sommers-Flanagan, J. (2018). Conversations about suicide: Strategies for detecting and assessing suicide risk. Journal of Health Service Psychology, 44, 33–45.

Abstract

When patients disclose suicidal thoughts, clinicians often feel their anxiety rise. The best remedies for clinician anxiety include an understanding of suicide dynamics and a thoughtful and empathic engagement with patients. Engagement with patients typically includes collaborative exploration of eight psychological, interpersonal, and situational dimensions related to suicidality. These dimensions are rooted in suicide theories and empirical research. In this article, specific strategies are described and illustrated, including strategies for initiating conversations about suicide, exploring different dimensions of suicide, and engaging patients in steps to increase their safety.

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