Becoming a Clinical Supervisor: Key Ethics Issues and Recommendations

Citation

Barnett, J. E. (2017). Becoming a clinical supervisor: Key ethics issues and recommendations. Journal of Health Service Psychology, 43, 10–18.

Abstract

Clinical supervision is an essential aspect of every health service provider’s professional development and training. Serving as a supervisor of a graduate student or trainee can be a very rewarding professional activity. But, what should you be aware of and what are the factors you should consider if offered the opportunity to provide clinical supervision? A number of clinical, ethics, legal, and practical issues are addressed to assist health service providers to enter into this role in a competent and effective manner. Specific issues addressed include understanding supervisor roles and responsibilities, what specific competencies are needed to be an effective supervisor and how to develop them, the qualities and practices of effective and ineffective supervisors; the difference between supervision and mentoring, how to effectively infuse ethics, legal, and diversity issues into supervision; and how to effectively end the supervision relationship. Specific guidance is provided and key resources for those interested in learning more about being a supervisor are provided.

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Some Ethical Considerations in Paid Peer Consultations in Health Care

Citation

Knapp, S., Gottlieb, M. C., Handelsman, M. M. (2017). Some ethical considerations in paid peer consultations in health care. Journal of Health Service Psychology, 43, 20–25.

Abstract

Professional associations often recommend consultation as an essential activity to ensure competence. Although consultation differs from supervision and includes generally few legal risks to the consultants, consulting psychologists should nonetheless strive to promote the effectiveness of the consultee’s practice. Few data exist to guide psychologists who are asked to be, or want to be, paid consultants, but we can offer suggestions based on our experience as consultants. We urge consulting psychologists to pay special attention to informed consent, maintaining appropriate boundaries, and ensuring that they remain within their boundaries of professional competence.

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Sensitive Employment Evaluations: 93% of Naval Aviation Personnel Receiving Mental Health Treatment Return to Flight Status

Citation

Chee, S. M., & De Cecchis, D. P. (2017). Sensitive employment evaluations: 93% of naval aviation personnel receiving mental health treatment return to flight status. Journal of Health Service Psychology, 43, 26–30.

Abstract

Mental health professionals and patients in sensitive employment situations, such as aviators, police officers, national security personnel, and surgeons, worry about the potential consequences of a psychiatric diagnosis and psychological treatment. Such “fitness for duty” evaluations are examples of mixed or dual agency clinical work. Using data about military aviators as an example, this project found that over 93% of the personnel who received mental health care received a medical recommendation (or “waiver”) to return to flying. Research with civilian aviators shows that 98% are granted approval to return to flying.

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School Threat Assessments: Psychological and Behavioral Considerations

Citation

Langman, P. (2017). School threat assessments: Psychological and behavioral considerations. Journal of Health Service Psychology, 43, 32–40.

Abstract

Preventing school shootings is a matter of conducting thorough, ongoing assessments of potential perpetrators. This is generally done in schools by a threat assessment team comprised of individuals in several roles and positions, including psychologists. This article addresses the importance of access to information and information exchange, warning signs of potential violence, elements of a comprehensive threat assessment (including motive, means, and opportunity), and the role of life stressors that contribute to desperation and rage, and three psychological types of school shooters.

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Optimizing Treatment with Easy to Use Technologies: Updating Your Clinical Toolbox

Citation

Magnavita, J. J. (2017). Optimizing treatment with easy to use technologies: Updating your clinical toolbox. Journal of Health Service Psychology, 43, 42–44.

Abstract

Technology is beginning to provide tools to assist and support psychological intervention, particularly in cases involving anxiety and depression. Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback (HRV), Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation (CES), and Neurofeedback (NFB) are relatively easy to incorporate into clinical practice. This article describes their use in clinical practice.

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Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy: Bringing 'in vivo' Into the Office

Citation

McMahon, E. (2017). Virtual reality exposure therapy: Bringing 'in vivo' into the office. Journal of Health Service Psychology, 43, 46–49.

Abstract

Exposure is a critical element in the successful treatment of phobias and anxiety disorders. Virtual reality offers the most efficient means of providing exposure in such treatment. Virtual reality exposure permits controlled, individualized, and repeatable exposure that might otherwise be difficult or impossible. Research and meta-analyses have demonstrated that virtual reality exposure therapy is effective and that the effects transfer to the real world and are maintained.

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