Implementing Routine Outcome Monitoring (ROM) in Clinical Practice

Citation

Lambert, M. J. (2017). Implementing routing outcome monitoring (ROM) in clinical practice. Journal of Health Service Psychology, 43, 55–59.

Abstract

Routine outcome monitoring (ROM) has become a recommended clinical practice. Evidence for the positive effects of monitoring client treatment response is presented, along with those aspects of monitoring that are needed to make it feasible and effective. The monitoring of the outcome of therapy can easily be implemented into private practice routines as well as agency procedures.

View References

 

Conducting Psychosocial Evaluations of Bariatric Surgery Candidates

Citation

Edwards-Hampton, S. A. (2017). Conducting psychosocial evaluations of bariatric surgery candidates. Journal of Health Service Psychology, 43, 61–65.

Abstract

A comprehensive psychosocial evaluation is the standard of practice with potential bariatric surgery candidates. Pre-surgery psychosocial evaluations gather information via clinical interview and administration of objective psychological measures. Such evaluations have a dual purpose: first to screen for contraindications for surgery, and second to identify pre-surgery and post-surgery psychological treatment needs.

View References

 

The Role of Psychological Testing in Pre-Surgical Bariatric Evaluations

Citation

Goodpaster, K. P. S. (2017). The role of psychological testing in pre-surgical bariatric evaluations. Journal of Health Service Psychology, 43, 67–73.

Abstract

Psychological testing should play an integral role in the pre-surgical psychological evaluation of bariatric surgery candidates. Generally, such testing involves at least one broad measure of general psychopathology, as well as 2–6 briefer and more specific assessments of depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and cognitive functioning as indicated. Ideally completed prior to the clinical interview, testing allows psychologists to identify key areas for further clinical assessment and evaluate the consistency between test and interview data.

View References

 

Ethical Issues in the Use of Interpreters with d/Deaf Patients

Citation

Boness, C. L. (2017). Ethical issues in the use of interpreters with d/Deaf patients. Journal of Health Service Psychology, 43, 75–78.

Abstract

Clinical work with individuals who are culturally and linguistically different from their therapist is a challenge involving ethical and psychotherapeutic issues. Individuals who have been d/Deaf the vast majority of their life and who use American Sign Language as their primary language are culturally and linguistically different from most psychotherapists. Using qualified mental health interpreters in psychotherapy with d/Deaf patients may facilitate the therapeutic process, support retention in treatment, and improve outcomes. A number of ethical and practical issues must also be addressed before and during the use of interpreters with individual patients.

View References

 

Clinical and Ethical Issues in Working with a Foreign Language Interpreter

Citation

Searight, H. R. (2017). Clinical and ethical issues in working with a foreign language interpreter. Journal of Health Service Psychology, 43, 79–82.

Abstract

With an increasing population of persons with limited English proficiency (LEP), psychologists are likely to need to conduct assessments through a foreign language interpreter at times. The goal of the interpreter-mediated patient encounter should be to approximate a language-congruent clinical encounter. Issues such as the spatial configuration of all participants during the session, guidelines for the interpreter’s verbalizations, and some modification of the psychologist’s interview style will maintain patient rapport while obtaining necessary patient information.

View References

 

Supreme Court 2016–2017: A New Justice and a Term of Surprising Importance

Citation

Smith, S. R. (2017). Supreme court 2016–2017: A new justice and term of surprising importance. Journal of Health Service Psychology, 43, 83–95.

Abstract

The 2016–2017 Supreme Court session included rulings on professional practice issues and social justice matters. Two cases involved educational opportunities for handicapped children, and three cases involved psychological practice standards related to death penalty situations. Arbitration clauses in healthcare agreements were ruled binding. It was determined that both parents can be listed on birth certificates in same-sex families. Seventy percent of all rulings during the term were unanimous.

View References