Scientists who study substance abuse found that substance use in women is related to “hormones, menstrual cycle, fertility, pregnancy, breastfeeding, and menopause.” Additionally, “women describe unique reasons for using drugs, including controlling weight, fighting exhaustion, coping with pain, and self-treating mental health problems.”

Drugabuse.gov notes that science has also found the following information on female substance use:

  • Women use substances differently than men, such as using smaller amounts of certain drugs for less time before they become addicted.
  • Women can respond to substances differently. For example, they may have more drug cravings and may be more likely to relapse after treatment. This could be affected by a woman’s menstrual cycle.
  • Sex hormones can make women more sensitive than men to the effects of some drugs.
  • Women who use drugs may also experience more physical effects on their heart and blood vessels.
  • Brain changes in women who use drugs can be different from those in men.
  • Women may be more likely to go to the emergency room or die from overdose or other effects of certain substances.
  • Women who are victims of domestic violence are at increased risk of substance use.
  • Divorce, loss of child custody, or the death of a partner or child can trigger women's substance use or other mental health disorders.
  • Women who use certain substances may be more likely to have panic attacks, anxiety, or depression.

Differences were also found in the way that females react to treatment than men. “Women report using some substances for a shorter period of time when they enter treatment. However, women's substance use tends to progress more quickly from first use to addiction. Withdrawal may also be more intense for women.”

For more information regarding women and substance abuse, please follow this link.